Blog

blog post image

The issue of child custody can come up in a variety of legal situations. When there are minor children in a divorce case, the court must determine issues of legal and physical custody of the parties’ children. Likewise, when parties are not married, one party may choose to file a petition to determine custody and parenting time.

Read More
blog post image

If you are pulled over and the officer suspects you of drunk driving, he or she may start asking you questions regarding where you are coming from, where you are heading, if you’ve had anything to drink that day, etc. You should politely decline to answer any questions. A simple, “I do not wish to discuss my day” should suffice.

Read More
blog post image

One of the most common questions asked is whether Michigan is a no-fault divorce state. The answer is yes, but the term "no-fault" is misleading, and many don't understand what it actually means for Michigan to be "no-fault."

Read More
blog post image

Many people are confused by the difference between a “Preliminary Breath Test,” commonly referred to as a “PBT” and an “Chemical Test.” Unfortunately, if you are pulled over on suspicion of drunk driving, the officer may not take the time to explain the difference to you, and your rights concerning each type of test are quite different.

Read More
blog post image

In Michigan, by accepting a license to operate a motor vehicle (driver’s license), you are consenting to submit to a chemical test upon the request of a peace officer if he or she has reasonable cause to believe that you are operating while intoxicated or under the influence of drugs.

Read More
blog post image

On February 5, 2019, the Michigan Court of Appeals issued its decision in Tambs v Jennings. Attorney Brian H. Jean represented the Defendants in both the Trial Court and Appeals Court. The clients had purchased a home out of foreclosure, and upon entering the home, found that the prior owners had abandoned all of their property.

Read More
blog post image

Michigan’s Central Registry is a concerning aspect of CPS investigations and can prohibit you from being able to volunteer in your child’s school, or workaround, or with children. Being placed on the Central Registry is done by a CPS worker and their supervisor by tallying up points from a worksheet called a ‘risk assessment.’

Read More